General Interest Writing

 
 
An alligator swims away in Okefenokee Swamp, March 2018  Photo credit: Nicole M. Baran

An alligator swims away in Okefenokee Swamp, March 2018

Photo credit: Nicole M. Baran

A precious wetland is under threat. We can save it.

By Nastassia V. Patin & Nicole M. Baran

Every year, half a million people visit the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge near the Florida-Georgia border to paddle through the peaceful waterways. The 438-acre federally protected swamp is home to more than 200 varieties of birds and 60 kinds of reptiles. Alligators cruise through the water and lounge on the banks for canoers to safely observe. Several threatened species like the gopher tortoise and eastern indigo snake call the refuge home. …

 

Abortion bans based on so-called “science” are fraudulent

Our silence in the face of new anti-choice laws across the U.S. is deafening

By Nicole M. Baran, Jane Zelikova, & Gretchen Goldman

We are scientists, and we believe that evidence, not ideology, should inform health care decisions. The wave of anti-abortion laws across the U.S. is the latest in a long string of attempts to falsely use the language and authority of science to justify denying people their basic human rights and inflict lasting harm. Although abortion is still legal in every state, recent legislation in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio threatens the future of abortion rights in the country. Scientists should, first and foremost, value evidence, and the evidence is clear: abortion bans cause harm. They make abortions less safe and especially harm historically marginalized communities. …

 
EGALITARIANS:  The psychologist and feminist Daniel Lehrman chose to study the ring dove, which shares the work of raising its young equally between male and female. Photograph by Yathin S Krishnappa / Wikicommons

EGALITARIANS: The psychologist and feminist Daniel Lehrman chose to study the ring dove, which shares the work of raising its young equally between male and female. Photograph by Yathin S Krishnappa / Wikicommons

How women came to dominate neuroendocrinology

A scientific field founded by men is now mostly female.

By Nicole M. Baran

When Kathleen Morrison stepped onto the stage to present her research on the effects of stress on the brains of mothers and infants, she was nearly seven and a half months pregnant. The convergence was not lost on Morrison, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, nor on her audience. If there ever was a group of scientists that would be both interested in her findings and unfazed by her late-stage pregnancy, it was this one. Nearly 90 percent were women. …